Something In The Way She Moves

While performance art is becoming one of the most influential strengths of the Southeast Asian contemporary art scene, being a performance artist in Indonesia is actually a rare thing, according to artist and curator Melati Suryodarmo. A veteran of the region who trained under renowned performance artist Marina Abramović, much has been written about her powerful durational performances that commonly last for many hours, such as her 12-hour endurance performance piece I’m A Ghost In My Own House in which she crushes and grinds hundreds of kilograms of charcoal briquettes into dust. The work was a finalist at the Singapore Art Museum’s third Asia Pacific Breweries (APB) Foundation Signature Art Prize in 2014.

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In Cambodia, Contemporary Artists Shed Light on Social and Environmental Issues

Riding through downtown Phnom Penh in a tuk tuk on my way to Sa Sa Bassac—the leading contemporary art gallery in Cambodia—I saw about 100 people marching in the street, holding signs and chanting slogans while flanked by cops on every side.

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A Pioneering Thai Artist in America

In 1958, Leo Castelli mounted the first solo exhibition of paintings by the American artist Jasper Johns. Johns challenged the hegemony of the brushstroke by paralyzing it in thick encaustic, shaking the pillars of the reigning Abstract Expressionist movement and deflecting the course of modernism.

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These 20 Female Artists Are Pushing Sculpture Forward

Sculpture was once considered the domain of ambitious male artists, a medium as challenging in its physicality as it was limitless in scope. But for several decades, artists from Eva Hesse and Senga Nengudi to Phyllida Barlow and Ursula von Rydingsvard have carved a place for women working in contemporary sculpture.

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Artists would do well to invest in their own work, study says

A new study by Amy Whitaker, an assistant professor in visual arts management at New York University, and Roman Kräussl, a professor of finance at the University of Luxembourg, has found that artists may be better off investing in their own work than in the stock market.

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This New $50k Prize Is Just for Emerging Female Figurative Painters

What is the most effective way to support female artists?

It’s a question that San Antonio-based patrons Steven Alan Bennett and Dr. Elaine Melotti Schmidt have been contemplating for almost a decade, since they first began collecting art. From the beginning, they gravitated towards work made by women, depicting women. It was what they loved and wanted to live with.

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Outsider art: what students can learn from self-taught artists

In 1939, former slave Bill Traylor was sitting on a box at the side of the road drawing when the artist Charles Shannon rode by on his horse. Touched by the pictures, Shannon supported Traylor and helped him exhibit his work. After his death, Traylor would become a significant figure of American folk and modern art – without a formal artistic education.

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One Great Question to Ask an Artist

David Zwirner Books hosted a panel discussion last night that felt like a master class in dinner-party conversations: If you find yourself clinking cocktail glasses with an artist, what should you ask them?

“Talking about what you make has to be one of the worst things in the world because it’s just a big soup,” painter Joanna Pousette-Dart, one of three New York City–based artists who participated in the panel, said.

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How to Be an Artist, According to Georgia O’Keeffe

“The notion that you can make an artist overnight, that there is nothing but genius, and a dash of temperament in artistic success is a fallacy,” artist Georgia O’Keeffe asserted when she was 40 years old in 1928. The year before, she’d been given her first retrospective at the Brooklyn Museum—an indisputable marker of success. But O’Keeffe, who would live to the age of 98, wasn’t done developing as an artist—or contemplating what it meant to be one.

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13 Southeast Asian Artists Talk Empowerment on International Women's Day

To mark International Women's Day we asked 13 musicians from Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines a few questions about being female in today's world. Sharing their words on womanhood are Maudy Ayunda (Indonesia), Leanne Mamonong from Leanne and Naara (Philippines), Dato' Sri Siti Nurhaliza (Malaysia), Anggun (Indonesia), Cooky Chua (Philippines), Flying Ipis' Deng Garcia (Philippines), Rossa (Indonesia), Ella (Malaysia) and Fazura (Malaysia). Rounding out the group are four members of The Ransom Collective (Philippines): Jerms Peck, Muriel Gonzales, Lily Gonzales and Leah Halili.

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Rebel with a Cause

Visual storyteller Sim Chi Yin is no stranger to taking risks. As a former newspaper foreign correspondent, the Singaporean is known for raising the visibility of the under-reported topics through meticulous research and powerful multimedia narration, such as with her current exhibition ‘Ban the Bomb’ at the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo, Norway from 12 December 2017 to 25 November 2018.

Sim was commissioned to showcase the work of Nobel Peace Prize 2017 winner International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN). Tasked with documenting the environs of nuclear weapons facilities in remote places in the United States and North Korea, Sim embarked on an intense and sometimes hazardous two-month journey, travelling 6,000 kilometres along the China-North Korea border and through six North American states to photograph and document missile silos and nuclear testing sites.

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